Neutering - benefits and issues to look for after neutering

Neutering is a common procedure performed on both dogs and cats, male and females and is associated with many positive effects on behaviour, health and longevity (Belanger et al., 2017) and is recommended by our vets. For female pets the neutering was shows to prevent uterine infections and breast tumours, they won’t go into heat. For males it helps prevent testicular cancer and prostate problems, and they will be better behaved and less likely to roam away from home.


According the a study done by Belanger et al. (2017) neutered dogs were at less risk of a number of early and congenital conditions including aortic stenosis, early onset cataracts, mitral valve disease, patent ductus arteriosus, portosystemic shunt and ventricular septal defect. Neutered male dogs were at less risk for bloat and dilated cardiomyopathy (Belanger et al., 2017).


It is important to know that neutering will not quickly resolve all behavioural problems.


Although there are lots of benefits the study also showed that neutered female dogs can be at an increased risk for intervertebral disk disease (Belanger et al., 2017). Neutering in both sexes was also significantly associated with an increased risk of cancer (haemangiosarcoma, hyperadrenocorticism, lymphoma, mast cell tumour and osteosarcoma), ruptured anterior cruciate ligament and epilepsy according to Belanger et al. (2017). Other recent reports suggest that neutering may increase the occurrence of some joint disorders.


With the above results in mind, we suggest that an appropriate mix of diet and dietary supplements (e.g. antioxidants, bone supplements) can help reduce the chances of these diseases appearing and can reduce the development of these conditions if they are in the incipient stage.


If you have any questions please come and speak to us and our vets will be able to give the best advice for your pet.


References

Belanger, J. M. et al. (2017). Effect of neuter status on inherited conditions in dogs, Canine Genetics and Epidemiology (2017) 4, 6 doi: 10.1186/s40575-017-0044-6.

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